IRaq: Accountability for the iraq war

 
 Baghdad, Iraq

Baghdad, Iraq

 

JAI is pioneering the war crime of aggression, a principle that was defined at the Nuremberg Trials as the "supreme” international crime. Learn about our efforts to seek accountability over the Iraq War, as a crime of aggression.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Seeking a judicial venue to litigate the legality of the Iraq War

  • Seeking redress for victims of the Iraq War through civil and criminal law

 

ENDING THE PERMANENT STATE OF EMERGENCY: STRIKING DOWN THE 9/11 AUMF

 
 A burning home.

A burning home.

 

The United States has been in perpetual war since the terrorist attacks of 9/11. The 9/11 Authorization for Use of Force (the “9/11 AUMF”) has created a permanent state of emergency that is destroying democracy and human rights protections, and leading to chaos domestically and abroad.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Seeking ways to strike down the 9/11 AUMF as illegal

  • Developing advocacy strategies to unify efforts to repeal the 9/11 AUMF

CLimate change: The International law of climate change

 
 Gangehi, the Maldives

Gangehi, the Maldives

 

As the world warms and as sea levels rise, continued government inaction is now laying the groundwork for unprecedented human hardship. JAI is one of the first legal non profits to understand the intimate link between human rights and climate change.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Developing the first ever comprehensive guide on the International Law of Climate Change

  • Investigating venues to bring cutting edge litigation designed to stabilize the climate

  • Investigating whether countries who face imminent destruction because of rising sea levels have a right to self-defense and self-determination under international law

  • Supporting the work of other litigation efforts through amicus briefs

  • Developing advocacy strategies to limit the damage of climate change and to stabilize the climate at pre-industrial levels of greenhouse gasses

 

YEMEN: The INTERNATIONAL RULES of war and peace

 
 Various defendants sitting at the Palace of Justice, Nuremberg, Germany, in 1946 as part the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

Various defendants sitting at the Palace of Justice, Nuremberg, Germany, in 1946 as part the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

 

In response to the crisis in Yemen, JAI is investigating the extent to which support for war crimes in that region are actionable under U.S. and international law.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Holding international leaders accountable for the crime of aggression and war crimes

  • Holding multinational corporations accountable for aiding and abetting war crimes

 

REFUGEES: Preparing for the great refugee crises to come

 
 The refugee crises of the future will affect all people.

The refugee crises of the future will affect all people.

 

The people movement we witness today is merely a preview of much greater people movement that will take place as a result of rising sea levels, warmer temperatures, droughts, extreme weather conditions, political instability and war.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Adding to the current international legal framework related to migrants to better fill the “gap” for climate migrants

  • Advocating for the rights of climate migrants

 

UNIVERSAL JURISDICTION: HOLDING THE POWERFUL accountable under law

 
 Den Haag, the Netherlands

Den Haag, the Netherlands

 

JAI has drafted the world’s first Universal Jurisdiction Practice Guide, designed as a reference for human rights practitioners all over the world.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Seeking avenues to expand the role of universal jurisdiction in national and international courts all over the world

For more information and downloading instructions for the JAI Universal Jurisdiction Practice Guide, click here.

 

CORPORATE LIABILITY: imposing human rights limitations on corporate conduct

 
 United Nations building, New York City, United States

United Nations building, New York City, United States

 

Corporations are some of the most powerful institutions ever created by humans, and their conduct has significant impacts on our natural environment and conflicts all over the world.

Current ongoing projects at JAI include:

  • Investigating the extent to which international law can impose reasonable human rights limitations on corporate power

  • Discovering ways to give corporations incentives to make their conduct more pro-social and less damaging to the world, so that corporate power can become a vehicle for positive social impact (“the carrot”)

  • Investigating the extent to which a corporation can have its corporate charter revoked if it continually engages in conduct that is destructive to democracy, the environment, or the global peace (“the stick”)